An analysis of the social status in emma a novel by jane austen

Marriage and social position are the primary focus of this work as the women characters, faithful to the social dynamics of the time, seek financial and social security through advantageous marriages.

An analysis of the social status in emma a novel by jane austen

Realism, Imagination and Charity

The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her. She would notice her; she would improve her; she would detach her from her bad acquaintance, and introduce her into good society; she would form her opinions and her manners.

It would be an interesting, and certainly a very kind undertaking; highly becoming her own situation in life, her leisure, and powers. Chapter 4 Quotes A young farmer, whether on horseback or on foot, is the very last sort of person to raise my curiosity.

The yeomanry are precisely the order of people with whom I feel I can have nothing to do. A degree or two lower, and a creditable appearance might interest me; I might hope to be useful to their families in some way or other.

But a farmer can need none of my help, and is therefore in one sense as much above my notice as in every other he is below it. Chapter 5 Quotes I think [Harriet Smith] the very worst sort of companion that Emma could possibly have.

She knows nothing herself, and looks upon Emma as knowing every thing. She is a flatterer in all her ways; and so much the worse, because undesigned.

Jane Austen (–) was born in Hampshire, England, where she spent most of her life. Though she received little recognition in her lifetime, she came to be regarded as one of the great masters of the English novel. David M. Shapard is the author of The Annotated Pride and Prejudice, The Annotated Persuasion, The Annotated Sense and Sensibility, The Annotated Emma, The Annotated. Austen presents many layers of social status in each of her novels, and Emma and Pride and Prejudice are no exceptions. One of the most memorable representations of social status in Emma is where the newly wed Mrs. Elton declares that she will have precedence over Emma at dinner parties because she is a married woman and married women . Emma, like most of Austen’s novels, is a study in 18th Century English society and the significance of propriety. The rich and “well-bred” control the social situations, issuing and initiating invitations and friendships. Those of low social standing depend upon the charity and initiative of those in the higher class.

Her ignorance is hourly flattery. How can Emma imagine she has any thing to learn herself, while Harriet is presenting such a delightful inferiority? And as for Harriet, I will venture to say that she cannot gain by the acquaintance.

Hartfield will only put her out of conceit with all the other places she belongs to. She will grow just refined enough to be uncomfortable with those among whom birth and circumstances have placed her home. She is not a clever girl, but she has better sense than you are aware of, and does not deserve to have her understanding spoken of so slightingly.

Waving that point, however, and supposing her to be, as you describe her, only pretty and good-natured, let me tell you, that in the degree she possesses them, they are not trivial recommendations to the world in general. Her good-nature, too, is not so very slight a claim, comprehending, as it does, real, thorough sweetness of temper and manner, a very humble opinion of herself, and a great readiness to be pleased with other people.

I am very much mistaken if your sex in general would not think such beauty, and such temper, the highest claims a woman could possess.

Jane Austen's Clergymen

Chapter 10 Quotes I have none of the usual inducements of women to marry. Were I to fall in love, indeed, it would be a different thing! And, without love, I am sure I should be a fool to change such a situation as mine. Fortune I do not want; employment I do not want; consequence I do not want: Emma Woodhouse speaker Related Themes: Never mind, Harriet, I shall not be a poor old maid; and it is poverty only which makes celibacy contemptible to a generous public!

A single woman, with a very narrow income, must be a ridiculous, disagreeable, old maid! Chapter 16 Quotes The first error, and the worst, lay at her door. It was foolish, it was wrong, to take so active a part in bringing any two people together.

It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious—a trick of what ought to be simple.Tweet. The free genealogy site is a free genealogy listings site encompassing a huge range of genealogy related links, articles, hobbies, help and guide sections and much more.

Updated daily with helpful advice, surnames, articles and links all dedicated to the online genealogy and ancestry sector, searching for that missing family history fact or just thinking about starting your family tree. Austen presents many layers of social status in each of her novels, and Emma and Pride and Prejudice are no exceptions.

The theme of Social Class in Emma from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

One of the most memorable representations of social status in Emma is where the newly wed Mrs. Elton declares that she will have precedence over Emma at dinner parties because she is a married woman and married women .

Questions of status and class are a major preoccupation of Jane Austen’s characters, and of the novels themselves. Professor John Mullan considers both the importance of social status and its satirical potential. ‘Rank is rank,’ Mr Elliot tells Anne in Persuasion, explaining why the company of.

An analysis of the social status in emma a novel by jane austen

Let us write or edit the research paper on your topic "Marriage and Social Status in Jane Austen's Emma" with a personal 20% discount. Questions of status and class are a major preoccupation of Jane Austen’s characters, and of the novels themselves.

Professor John Mullan considers both the importance of social status and its satirical potential. ‘Rank is rank’, Mr Elliot tells Anne in Persuasion, explaining why the company of. Emma’s misplaced confidence in her abilities as a matchmaker and her prudish fear of love constitute the central focus of the novel, which traces Emma’s mistakes and growing self-understanding.

Read an in-depth analysis of Emma Woodhouse.

SparkNotes: Emma: Themes